Posts Tagged ‘Marie D. Jones’

Announcing Happy Catastrophe Productions!

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

Hey all! Sometimes creative life takes new directions. This quick note is to announce the formation of Happy Catastrophe Productions with writing and producing partners Marie D. Jones and Brian Keith Ellis. Yay! Putting Producer on my resume isn’t something I imagined in my life, but there it is. We don’t have all of our official stuff up yet such as website, business cards and all of that jazz, but that will be in the works. We’ll develop projects for film and television. Right now we’re working on our own projects.

Early last year my creativity took a different direction. Marie optioned Blackout and Love From The Ashes for television and film and that started a new creative movement in my life. I started working on horror and less romance (although I’m not dropping romance all together). Over the years I’ve discovered a few creativity truths for me. Whenever I concentrate on what “feels” right for me to pursue in a writing direction, the more opportunities come my way. So I’m sticking with that formula!

As soon as I have more to announce on Happy Catastrophe Productions, I’ll be sure to let you all know.

Laters taters!

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Sharing: Working On A TV Series

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

Hey all! I thought I’d do a drive by posting and share one simple tidbit I’m working on with the fantabulous (yes I spelled it that way) Marie D. Jones (Producer/Writer at Where’s Lucy? Productions) and Producer/Writer Brian Keith Ellis. Can’t tell you how exiting this is! This is a preliminary poster and things change. So stay tuned for updates!

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All The Things: Movies, TV Series & Horror Best Seller

Sunday, November 27th, 2016

Hello everyone. My writing world runneth over. Just a few little updates! To find details on the books mentioned, stop by here.

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NIGHTMARES & ECHOES III CHARITY ANTHOLOGY #2 BEST SELLER!

Gorillas With Scissors Press introduces a yearly horror anthology with 50% of the proceeds going toward a charity every year. This year the contributions go to St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. I’m happy to say that I’m included in this year’s anthology with my spooky story Comeuppance. Just recently I learned the anthology has zipped to #2 on the Horror Anthology bestseller list at Amazon. How amazing is that?

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MOVIES/TV SERIES NEWS

In other quick catch up news, my story Blackout is still in development for television, and recently I started working on another TV series with producer/writer Marie D. Jones (Where’s Lucy Productions) and producer/writer Brian Keith Ellis. Exciting writing times. When I can reveal more on these projects I’ll be sure to let you know.

ZOMBIES AND HORROR

I finished writing my zombie series of books and I’m slowly working through revisions in between participating in NANOWRIMO in November. Although I won’t finish NANOWRIMO this year, I’m perfectly okay with that. I still achieved a lot of writing. I think December might be a good time to take a chill pill and relax a little before the new year starts.

Until next time, live, love and dream.

 

Marie D. Jones: The Power of Spells and Curses

Saturday, October 1st, 2016

Welcome to my Halloween Spooktacular! I’m starting off the season with a blog from Marie D. Jones. Welcome Marie!

Some people will believe anything. Even when it comes to things like spells and curses. Whether superstitious or not, if someone tells us they put a curse on us, some small part of our minds will feel that twinge of fear, even as all rational thinking tells us it’s nothing to worry about. Really. But do curses and spells ever have so much power they can actually kill, heal, or change our destinies?

Fetishism, the belief that a physical object can have supernatural powers, is as old as humanity itself. The use of blood, animal fur, claws, beads, coins, rings, feathers, stones, gems and crystals, and specific plants and animals by native and primitive peoples is no different from our use today of crucifixes, Buddha statuettes, Holy Water, Star of David necklaces, Rosary Beads, voodoo dolls, the Italian Horn to ward off evil eye, worry beads, prayer stones, and even four-leafed clovers and lucky charms.

The belief that symbols hold as much power and influence as what they are supposed to symbolize still makes up a part of everyday religious life. When a Christian takes the body and blood of Christ at Communion, they may not realize it, but they are practicing a type of fetishism, giving the wafer and wine a level of power which they do not have as physical objects, but rather as symbols of something far greater.

Yet, some may argue that the objects DO have power on their own. Perhaps we are somehow sending the object energy, which is then reflected back to us (or even absorbed into the substrate material itself,) based upon our motivation or use of the object. If we believe strongly enough that a lucky charm will make us, well, lucky, perhaps we may be raising the resonant frequency of the object to match the resonant frequency of our intention. We may be “instilling” a particular energy into the object, which then raises or lowers the object’s actual resonant frequency depending upon whether it will be used to charm, or to harm.

Generally, we think of the occult arts when we think of talismans, intricately designed charms worn about the neck or kept in a pocket, however, one only has to walk into a church, temple, or synagogue to see modern day talismans. Although the Catholic Church and Christian churches in general shun talismans and amulets as “witchcraft,” their own use of beads and crosses and statues of saints show that the idea of putting power into a physical object is not always the domain of evil-doers. In the Jewish tradition, amulets are abundant, many carrying holy names or phrases taken from holy texts. The Jewish tallis is a fringed prayer shawl with knotted tassels used in a similar fashion as Catholic Rosary Beads. The word “tallis” even sounds similar to “talisman,” although most linguistic experts believe the word “talisman” is of Greek origin, from the word “telsma” for “to initiate into the mysteries” (the word “amulet” comes from the Latin word amuletum for “an object that protects a person from trouble.”)

In the Muslim culture, individuals also wear amulets that bear chosen inscriptions from the Quran. Known as “Ta’wiz,” these medals are used in different situations to symbolize different things, just as one might wear a medal of a four-leafed clover to attract good, or the Khamsa pendant of Fatima’s Hand that supposedly wards off the evil eye.

The most obvious use of fetishes, talismans and amulets comes to us from the West African traditions and folk beliefs. West African Vodun or Voudou is a religion practiced throughout coastal West Africa. It is an animistic tradition, with a cosmology filled with a hierarchy of various vodun, or spirits and divine elements governing humans and the earth. Deities are called orishas, suggesting a pantheistic worldview, but there is One God, as in monotheism, with the orishas as God’s helpers (similar to the idea of the Christian God and his angels). Cuban Santeria, also practiced in some Southern American cities with large Cuban populations, is similar to Vodun, but has adopted many Christian symbols and rituals to create a syncretized and very much misunderstood religious practice.

What is most notable about these religions, which are far more organized than people might think, is that followers have a distinct relationship with nature, both the seen and unseen. Vodun practices often involve animal sacrifice and ancestral worship, even the “possession” of humans by deities during intense rituals. High on the list of beliefs is the power of fetishes and talismans to heal, or to harm. Mojo bags are magic charms wrapped in a cloth or animal skin bag, often red, tied with a drawstring. The bags can contain anything from magical rocks, animal feathers and claws, petitions to the deities and spirits, and even plant leaves. The Mojo inside the bag gives a person magical power.

Similar in intent, Gris-gris is an amulet to protect the wearer from evil, or attract luck and fortune. This small cloth bag is filled with herbs, stones, bones, hair and even grave dirt, emphasizing personal items of either the wearer, or the one intended to benefit from the contents. Gris-gris is often used for negative purposes as well, usually to conjure or cast a curse or hex on someone. Often it is left on the victim’s doorstep so that they see it and the reaction is often a slow death based upon the simple power of suggestion.

Thankfully, most Vodun followers use their religion for good, but there are sorcerers called Botono or Azetos who cast hexes and curses to bring harm to enemies (one might call that defensive black magick!). One of their favorite tools for bringing about such harm is the voodoo doll, a poppit constructed out of crude materials and colorful cloth to represent the spirit of a particular person. Voodoo dolls can be constructed with household items and are anywhere from elaborately decorated to crudely fashioned. Some call these dolls effigies, although most effigies are actually full-length figures of a person – alive or dead.

Worry Dolls, or Trouble Dolls, traditionally made in Guatemala, take a different perspective. Tiny dolls constructed of wood and cloth, these colorful dolls are often placed under pillows or “worried over” like rosary beads, and are usually used to help children heal from surgeries, as well as get over fears during the treatment of diseases. The doll is said to worry in the person’s place, allowing the person to rest, relax, and wake up with no worries.

Aboriginal Australians have a ritual of execution that utilizes a ceremonial bone called a Kundela or “death bone.” If the Kundela is pointed at a person, usually someone condemned or cast out by the tribe, that person will die. The “pointing of the bone” is always done by a powerful member of the tribe, and is accompanied by a chant that is said to curse the recipient. Famous oddity hunter John Godwin describes on Trivia-Library.com his own experience witnessing a young Mailli tribesman who had been “pointed” waste a way and die in a hospital, despite excellent medical care. The doctors could find nothing physically wrong with the tribesman, yet Godwin stated, “He died before our eyes, in dreadful agony, apparently from the mere knowledge that he must die.”

Magical tools and ritual objects have been used in ancient witchcraft and modern Wicca for centuries…from wands and swords to cauldrons and athames charged with energy used to carry out spells (positive, that is!), these tools are said to hold power in them, but one must ask if the power comes from the belief itself that the tools are sacred and special.

Desire and intent may play a role in the manifestation of spells that are cast for good. Telling someone that you are putting a spell on them to find more love in their lives would no doubt feed into the subconscious, and change both the awareness and the perception of the person. Telling someone you are cursing them to death with a chicken bone because they stole your gold might also work towards its goal, if the person you are cursing is guilty and already struggling with their own inner demons about what they’ve done.

It is almost as if the mind becomes sympathetic to the spell or curse. The weaker or more unstable and afraid the mind, the more the spell or curse affects it. Sympathetic magic suggests that like attracts, and affects, like, and that everything is connected and linked on an invisible realm. Therefore, the act of sticking a pin in a doll is supposed to harm the person the doll represents, because what occurs in the symbolic sense has an outcome in the empirical world.

Sympathetic magic is based upon two laws: the law of similarity, and the law of contagion. The law of similarity suggests that an effect will closely resemble its own cause, while the law of contagion suggests that the connectedness of all things guarantees that once we come in contact with something or someone, we remain so. A voodoo practitioner may use these laws to produce a desired effect by speaking it or imitating it. The contagion aspect occurs when another person “buys into” the whole situation and ends up manifesting the desired effect, as if the practitioner and patient were one and the same, connected by some unseen web or strand, sympathetic to the same intention between them.

The Creighton University Medical Center’s website on complimentary and alternative medicine (http://AltMed.creighton.edu/) features an interesting article titled “The Science of Voodoo,” which discusses several scientific studies into the claims of voodoo as an effective healing modality. These studies were conducted to determine the validity of voodoo in a medical sense; whether voodoo relies on suggestibility alone for its placebo-like effects, or on the various herbs often used in rituals and their actual therapeutic and toxicological value. Studies included one for the Volume 42, Number 7 2002 issue of “Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain,” which concluded that the improvement of symptoms in voodoo patients is mainly from placebo effects. By concurrently stimulating and inhibiting the nervous system, there appears to be an improvement of pain. The study author, Seymour Solomon, gives the example of someone drinking an herbal treatment over the body of a dead rabbit as both stimulation and inhibition of the nervous system, which may lead to relief.

Voodoo and other alternative healing modalities may be more “nocebo” than placebo. In voodoo practices, often the patient is cursed with negative intentions, and the nocebo effect is the result of experiencing a harmful outcome because that is the outcome that the patient expects. It is not so much that spirits and demons are conferring the negative energy and sickness, as it is the mind of the believer. The expectation of illness or death appears to lead to illness and death in voodoo and other such belief systems.

This concept leads to another interesting aspect of curses and spells. The more powerful the one who is casting the curse or spell is perceived to be by the patient, the more powerful the patient will manifest the curse or spell. A village medicine man or voodoo priest will have more ability to mold the belief of the villagers than someone with less spiritual authority. Even in our culture, we tend to look up to and trust our doctors and surgeons, and if they pronounce us terminally ill, many of us may “believe” them far more than we would if the same diagnosis happened to come from a neighbor or stranger on a subway.

Too many factors come into play in determining the power of spells and curses to be effective. The person at the receiving end seems to be the biggest factor of all. Do they believe? Do they accept their fate, good or bad? Are their minds strong enough to “unbelieve” negative input? Is the subconscious in charge, thus no matter what they think they believe is null and void?

Mind over matter, or mind over other minds, it may all be up to each of us as individuals how much control we give to outside thoughts, forces and beliefs that could hurt or harm us.

**

CONTEST:

Like Marie’s Facebook author page:

https://www.facebook.com/MarieDJonesWriter/

And the first one to do so and leave Marie a private message saying if they owned, or still own, a “lucky charm” of some type will win a signed copy of their choice of one of the following books:

THIS BOOK IS FROM THE FUTURE: A Journey Through Portals, Relativity, Worm Holes and Other Adventures in Time Travel

VIRAL MYTHOLOGY: How The Truth of the Ancients Was Encoded and Passed Down Through Legend, Art and Architecture

THE TRINITY SECRET: The Power of Three and the Code of Creation

MIND WARS: The History of Mind Control, Social Programming and Surveillance

Marie D. Jones

Writer/Producer

http://whereslucyproductions.com

www.mariedjones.com

http://www.vesuvianmedia.com

http://agresticproductions.com

 

Movies, TV & Bright Frontier Films News!

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

Hey there everyone. I’ve got a great poster for a pitch to share with you. Okay, two posters. In amazing news, it was officially announced recently that in connection with Where’s Lucy? Productions I’m now a part of Bright Frontier Films in their pitch efforts to make Blackout and Love From The Ashes into film/TV. These are two of the cool graphics that are a part of that effort. Thank you Bright Frontier Films! If you want to get a closer look at the two graphics below just click on them. Until next time!

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Marie D. Jones: A Family Writing Affair & Supervolcano

Monday, January 4th, 2016

Several years ago I had the good fortune of meeting Marie D. Jones on line and interviewing her for my blog talk radio show Authors Unplugged. Over the years I’ve read her non-fiction and heard her speak on a variety of paranormal and unusual topics. Every time I’ve been fascinated by the new things I’ve learned. Today I’m welcoming Marie to my blog to talk about her non-fiction book Supervolcano. Marie has just released an updated version of this fascinating book. Welcome Marie!

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When I decided to ask my father, a geophysicist, to write a book with me, I had no idea how the process would work. My father, Dr. John M. Savino, was a brilliant scientist and author of dozens of published scientific articles. Technical writing was one thing, but could he actually write a mainstream non-fiction book with me? I was a pro at it, having already written a few books, even one in collaboration with another author. I knew the ups and the downs of trying to format and structure a book with another person, a task hard enough with someone who is not a “technical writer.”

But I knew my dad had always dreamed of writing a book, and I wanted to be able to offer him that gift, that opportunity, because I had it to offer. So we talked about it and decided to write about a new theory making its way through the earth science world involving the supervolcanic eruption of Toba in Sumatra over 75,000 years ago that literally altered our human genetic history. The theory was not my father’s, but he was a supporter and had his own years of related research to discuss. We talked about how we would work together, with him providing most of the hard science research, and me writing on less technical subjects. I’d put it all together in a cohesive format, and we’d both edit the hell out of it to make sure the science and theories were sound.

Thus, Supervolcano: The Catastrophic Event That Changed the Course of Human History was born. My agent, Lisa Hagan, immediately secured us a book deal with my current publisher, New Page Books. They were excited about the fun collaboration of father and daughter, as well as the intriguing subject matter. We began the process of outlining and researching, and as my father turned in his scientific “stuff,” I began to put it into shape as our manuscript. Our biggest problem was finding a way to streamline the writing styles so that it didn’t look or read choppy, and somehow we succeeded in combining two very distinct styles of writing into one. Because my father lived in Las Vegas, and I lived in San Diego, we exchanged tons of phone calls and even more emails between us, putting everything together and double-checking our work as our deadline crept closer. My dad was adamant that the book not be sensationalistic, although we did have a blast including a fictional scenario of how a supereruption at Long Valley Caldera in California might play out. Yet, even for that fictional scenario, we interviewed scientists and government officials to make sure we presented a realistic portrayal.

My dad and I had never been that close. Growing up, he wasn’t super emotional or accessible, although he loved his kids. We talked few and far between as I got older, especially after he and my mom divorced and he moved away and remarried. Writing the book together was a way for us to reconnect and rediscover shared interests and passions. We had always shared interests over the years…science, horseracing, books, sports… But this book gave us the chance to come back into each other’s lives in a way nothing else could, and lessen some of the distance between us.

The book took us about eight months to write, and was officially released in 2007. My father was nervous and excited, having to do radio shows and media interviews. The most he had experienced were lectures before hundreds of geophysicists and seismologists. We even went on Coast-To-Coast AM together and were a huge hit. It was so amazing to see how excited my dad was to talk about his work, ideas, theories and the book itself.

Immediately, we began discussing a second book, one perhaps on my dad’s own micro quake theory he was developing…or perhaps a book about the feasible ways the world might end from natural disasters, or at least be irrevocably changed by them. But then my dad got sick. For about three years, he grew more ill and weaker and no one could properly diagnose what was wrong. Then he got the awful news. He had ALS, a terrible degenerative disease that steals away the muscles and organs, and yet leaves the brain intact. For my father, it was a slow and brutal death, made even more brutal by the fact that his brain was still fully functioning. He WANTED to continue to read, research, learn and even write. But his body failed him. He could no longer use his hands to type or hold a book. He lost his voice and ability to swallow. It was horrifying to watch, as my dad became a lifeless ghost.

He passed away the day after Christmas of 2011. We never did write that second book. Just this year, I decided to buy back the rights to “Supervolcano” and update it with some new research I knew my dad would be excited about. I decided to publish it on my own, in eBook and print, in honor of the man who gave me my own rabid passion for science.

I miss my dad. But in a way, I decided to bookend the experience of writing with my father by writing with my son. In 2014, my son, Max, and I began a middle grade science fiction series called EKHO: EVIL KID HUNTING ORGANIZATION, based on the real life spy group he formed in grade school when he was being bullied…with a little extra sci fi magic thrown in. Listening to my son recount his EKHO days and activities and getting it all down on paper reminded me of working with my dad, and the fun and excitement of sharing interests and creating a book together. The second book in the EKHO series is coming out in 2016, with four more to follow.

I am not sure how many other writers out there have had the distinct pleasure of writing a book with a parent, or a child. It’s a bonding experience like no other, and one that I will take with me all my life. Every time I hold “Supervolcano” in my hand, or discuss it with someone, I know my dad is right there looking over my shoulder, smiling proudly at our combined creation!

**

Thank you Marie. You can find Marie and information on her books at:

Marie D. Jones
Writer/Producer
www.mariedjones.com
Co-Founder – ParaExplorers
www.paraexplorers.com

Twitter

Facebook

 

 

Marie D. Jones: I Put A Spell On You! The Power of Spells and Curses

Saturday, October 10th, 2015

Several years ago I had the honor of interviewing Marie D. Jones on my Blog Talk Radio Show Authors Unplugged. Even before that I’d heard her speak on quite a few radio shows, and I was impressed with the depth and breadth of her knowledge about an amazing array of subjects. In the spirit of my favorite holiday, Halloween, I present to you Marie’s take on spells, curses, and the power of the mind. Welcome Marie!


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Some people will believe anything. Even when it comes to things like spells and curses. Whether superstitious or not, if someone tells us they put a curse on us, some small part of our minds will feel that twinge of fear, even as all rational thinking tells us it’s nothing to worry about. Really. But do curses and spells ever have so much power they can actually kill, heal, or change our destinies?

Fetishism, the belief that a physical object can have supernatural powers, is as old as humanity itself. The use of blood, animal fur, claws, beads, coins, rings, feathers, stones, gems and crystals, and specific plants and animals by native and primitive peoples is no different from our use today of crucifixes, Buddha statuettes, Holy Water, Star of David necklaces, Rosary Beads, voodoo dolls, the Italian Horn to ward off evil eye, worry beads, prayer stones, and even four-leafed clovers and lucky charms.

The belief that symbols hold as much power and influence as what they are supposed to symbolize still makes up a part of everyday religious life. When a Christian takes the body and blood of Christ at Communion, they may not realize it, but they are practicing a type of fetishism, giving the wafer and wine a level of power which they do not have as physical objects, but rather as symbols of something far greater.

Yet, some may argue that the objects DO have power on their own. Perhaps we are somehow sending the object energy, which is then reflected back to us (or even absorbed into the substrate material itself,) based upon our motivation or use of the object. If we believe strongly enough that a lucky charm will make us, well, lucky, perhaps we may be raising the resonant frequency of the object to match the resonant frequency of our intention. We may be “instilling” a particular energy into the object, which then raises or lowers the object’s actual resonant frequency depending upon whether it will be used to charm, or to harm.

Generally, we think of the occult arts when we think of talismans, intricately designed charms worn about the neck or kept in a pocket, however, one only has to walk into a church, temple, or synagogue to see modern day talismans. Although the Catholic Church and Christian churches in general shun talismans and amulets as “witchcraft,” their own use of beads and crosses and statues of saints show that the idea of putting power into a physical object is not always the domain of evil-doers. In the Jewish tradition, amulets are abundant, many carrying holy names or phrases taken from holy texts. The Jewish tallis is a fringed prayer shawl with knotted tassels used in a similar fashion as Catholic Rosary Beads. The word “tallis” even sounds similar to “talisman,” although most linguistic experts believe the word “talisman” is of Greek origin, from the word “telsma” for “to initiate into the mysteries” (the word “amulet” comes from the Latin word amuletum for “an object that protects a person from trouble.”)

In the Muslim culture, individuals also wear amulets that bear chosen inscriptions from the Quran. Known as “Ta’wiz,” these medals are used in different situations to symbolize different things, just as one might wear a medal of a four-leafed clover to attract good, or the Khamsa pendant of Fatima’s Hand that supposedly wards off the evil eye.

The most obvious use of fetishes, talismans and amulets comes to us from the West African traditions and folk beliefs. West African Vodun or Voudou is a religion practiced throughout coastal West Africa. It is an animistic tradition, with a cosmology filled with a hierarchy of various vodun, or spirits and divine elements governing humans and the earth. Deities are called orishas, suggesting a pantheistic worldview, but there is One God, as in monotheism, with the orishas as God’s helpers (similar to the idea of the Christian God and his angels). Cuban Santeria, also practiced in some Southern American cities with large Cuban populations, is similar to Vodun, but has adopted many Christian symbols and rituals to create a syncretized and very much misunderstood religious practice.

What is most notable about these religions, which are far more organized than people might think, is that followers have a distinct relationship with nature, both the seen and unseen. Vodun practices often involve animal sacrifice and ancestral worship, even the “possession” of humans by deities during intense rituals. High on the list of beliefs is the power of fetishes and talismans to heal, or to harm. Mojo bags are magic charms wrapped in a cloth or animal skin bag, often red, tied with a drawstring. The bags can contain anything from magical rocks, animal feathers and claws, petitions to the deities and spirits, and even plant leaves. The Mojo inside the bag gives a person magical power.

Similar in intent, Gris-gris is an amulet to protect the wearer from evil, or attract luck and fortune. This small cloth bag is filled with herbs, stones, bones, hair and even grave dirt, emphasizing personal items of either the wearer, or the one intended to benefit from the contents. Gris-gris is often used for negative purposes as well, usually to conjure or cast a curse or hex on someone. Often it is left on the victim’s doorstep so that they see it and the reaction is often a slow death based upon the simple power of suggestion.

Thankfully, most Vodun followers use their religion for good, but there are sorcerers called Botono or Azetos who cast hexes and curses to bring harm to enemies (one might call that defensive black magick!). One of their favorite tools for bringing about such harm is the voodoo doll, a poppit constructed out of crude materials and colorful cloth to represent the spirit of a particular person. Voodoo dolls can be constructed with household items and are anywhere from elaborately decorated to crudely fashioned. Some call these dolls effigies, although most effigies are actually full-length figures of a person – alive or dead.

Worry Dolls, or Trouble Dolls, traditionally made in Guatemala, take a different perspective. Tiny dolls constructed of wood and cloth, these colorful dolls are often placed under pillows or “worried over” like rosary beads, and are usually used to help children heal from surgeries, as well as get over fears during the treatment of diseases. The doll is said to worry in the person’s place, allowing the person to rest, relax, and wake up with no worries.

Aboriginal Australians have a ritual of execution that utilizes a ceremonial bone called a Kundela or “death bone.” If the Kundela is pointed at a person, usually someone condemned or cast out by the tribe, that person will die. The “pointing of the bone” is always done by a powerful member of the tribe, and is accompanied by a chant that is said to curse the recipient. Famous oddity hunter John Godwin describes on Trivia-Library.com his own experience witnessing a young Mailli tribesman who had been “pointed” waste a way and die in a hospital, despite excellent medical care. The doctors could find nothing physically wrong with the tribesman, yet Godwin stated, “He died before our eyes, in dreadful agony, apparently from the mere knowledge that he must die.”

Magical tools and ritual objects have been used in ancient witchcraft and modern Wicca for centuries…from wands and swords to cauldrons and athames charged with energy used to carry out spells (positive, that is!), these tools are said to hold power in them, but one must ask if the power comes from the belief itself that the tools are sacred and special.

Desire and intent may play a role in the manifestation of spells that are cast for good. Telling someone that you are putting a spell on them to find more love in their lives would no doubt feed into the subconscious, and change both the awareness and the perception of the person. Telling someone you are cursing them to death with a chicken bone because they stole your gold might also work towards its goal, if the person you are cursing is guilty and already struggling with their own inner demons about what they’ve done.

It is almost as if the mind becomes sympathetic to the spell or curse. The weaker or more unstable and afraid the mind, the more the spell or curse affects it. Sympathetic magic suggests that like attracts, and affects, like, and that everything is connected and linked on an invisible realm. Therefore, the act of sticking a pin in a doll is supposed to harm the person the doll represents, because what occurs in the symbolic sense has an outcome in the empirical world.

Sympathetic magic is based upon two laws: the law of similarity, and the law of contagion. The law of similarity suggests that an effect will closely resemble its own cause, while the law of contagion suggests that the connectedness of all things guarantees that once we come in contact with something or someone, we remain so. A voodoo practitioner may use these laws to produce a desired effect by speaking it or imitating it. The contagion aspect occurs when another person “buys into” the whole situation and ends up manifesting the desired effect, as if the practitioner and patient were one and the same, connected by some unseen web or strand, sympathetic to the same intention between them.

The Creighton University Medical Center’s website on complimentary and alternative medicine (http://AltMed.creighton.edu/) features an interesting article titled “The Science of Voodoo,” which discusses several scientific studies into the claims of voodoo as an effective healing modality. These studies were conducted to determine the validity of voodoo in a medical sense; whether voodoo relies on suggestibility alone for its placebo-like effects, or on the various herbs often used in rituals and their actual therapeutic and toxicological value. Studies included one for the Volume 42, Number 7 2002 issue of “Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain,” which concluded that the improvement of symptoms in voodoo patients is mainly from placebo effects. By concurrently stimulating and inhibiting the nervous system, there appears to be an improvement of pain. The study author, Seymour Solomon, gives the example of someone drinking an herbal treatment over the body of a dead rabbit as both stimulation and inhibition of the nervous system, which may lead to relief.

Voodoo and other alternative healing modalities may be more “nocebo” than placebo. In voodoo practices, often the patient is cursed with negative intentions, and the nocebo effect is the result of experiencing a harmful outcome because that is the outcome that the patient expects. It is not so much that spirits and demons are conferring the negative energy and sickness, as it is the mind of the believer. The expectation of illness or death appears to lead to illness and death in voodoo and other such belief systems.

This concept leads to another interesting aspect of curses and spells. The more powerful the one who is casting the curse or spell is perceived to be by the patient, the more powerful the patient will manifest the curse or spell. A village medicine man or voodoo priest will have more ability to mold the belief of the villagers than someone with less spiritual authority. Even in our culture, we tend to look up to and trust our doctors and surgeons, and if they pronounce us terminally ill, many of us may “believe” them far more than we would if the same diagnosis happened to come from a neighbor or stranger on a subway.

Too many factors come into play in determining the power of prayer, or of curses, to be effective. The person at the receiving end seems to be the biggest factor of all. Do they believe? Do they accept their fate, good or bad? Are their minds strong enough to “unbelieve” negative input? Is the subconscious in charge, thus no matter what they think they believe is null and void?

Mind over matter, or mind over other minds, it may all be up to each of us as individuals how much control we give to outside thoughts, forces and beliefs that could hurt or harm us.

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Thank you Marie! It’s been great having you here today. Check out Marie’s wide variety of intriguing, amazing books. The cover for The Deja Vu Enigma is but one of her titles, both fiction and non fiction. Hey, if you read The Deja Vu Enigma you’ll even see me in there. 🙂 For more information on all of Marie’s work, stop by her website here.

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Marie D. Jones & The Paranormal & Exploring The Grid

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

Today I’m honored to have Marie D. Jones as a guest on my blog. I also had the opportunity to interview Marie a few years back when I did the Author Unplugged show on Blog Talk Radio. Where do I start telling you about this multi-talented lady?

Marie is the author of “PSIence: How New Discoveries in Quantum Physics and New Science May Explain the Existence of Paranormal Phenomena,” “Destiny vs. Choice: The Scientific and Spiritual Evidence Behind Fate and Free Will,” “11:11 – The Time Prompt Phenomenon,” “The Déjà vu Enigma” and several other books. Her latest releases are “This Book Is From the Future: A Journey Through Portals, Relativity, Wormholes and Other Adventures in Time Travel” and “The Grid: Exploring the Hidden Infrastructure of Reality.” She has been on hundreds of radio shows and appeared on the History Channel’s “Nostradamus Effect” and “Ancient Aliens” television series. She is also a co-host on the popular Dreamland Radio show.

Marie is a staff writer for Intrepid Magazine and a regular contributor to New Dawn Magazine, Paranoia Magazine, and FATE Magazine. She has written and lectured widely about cutting edge science, the paranormal, Ufology, consciousness, Noetics, and metaphysics. Her essays and articles have appeared in dozens of books, anthologies and magazines, and she is the screenwriter of “19 Hz,” a paranormal thriller in development with Bruce Lucas Films. You can find her website at www.mariedjones.com.

Without delay get that cup of coffee and settle in while Marie tells us about Walking The Grid.

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“If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear as it is – infinite.”  William Blake

All my life I’ve been asking the same question. What is reality?

Countless sages, scientists, philosophers and spiritual leaders have asked that question, so I am not alone by any means. Yet even with all the scientific and technological advancements we’ve made over the last 100 years, we still know little, if anything at all, about the true nature of reality.

But perhaps there have been clues available to this great mystery all along, right in front of us, hidden in plain sight. Clues that suggest an actual structure, or infrastructure, that is mirrored in the laws of science, spoken of in the holiest of religious texts, and evident in the construct of our own bodies, brains and minds. A structure that we exist within, and are a part of, and can even move about its many levels to perceive realities far beyond that of our mundane 3D existence. A structure that, once experienced, opens us up to amazing new potentialities, abilities and experiences we never imagined possible. A structure that science, spirituality and metaphysics alike recognizes, from the world of quantum physics and the Zero Point Field, to the various levels of consciousness and altered states of mind, to the layered worlds of shamans and medicine healers, the concept of The Grid is found everywhere and goes by many names and variations.

A little over six years ago, I was contacted via email by a guy named Larry Flaxman who had read my book “PSIence” about quantum physics and the paranormal. We emailed back and forth a bit, and thus a legendary friendship and partnership was born. Larry and I came together from across the country over a shared interest and passion for finding answers to the biggest questions of human existence. Who are we? How did we get here? Do we have a purpose? Are there other worlds than this one? We combined forces and began working together as partners in a venture called ParaExplorers, a play on words describing a “pair of explorers” journeying into the unknown territories of worlds seen and unseen.

We also wrote a bunch of books together that chronicled our interests in all things science, paranormal, anomalous and just plain strange, including the nature of numbers, how the human mind helps create and perceive reality, time travel, the code of creation found in the trinity, and a host of topics that have secured us as the modern day “Scully and Mulder” from the X-Files. Yet we felt that all the years we were working and writing were leading to something more cumulative, something more “grand” in scope, and we realized we needed to write a book about the one theory we most felt could bring together science, religion and metaphysics, and the paranormal, in a sort of “unified theory of everything.”

In our books “11:11- The Time Prompt Phenomenon,” “The Resonance Key: Exploring the Links Between Vibration, Consciousness and the Zero Point Grid,” “The Déjà vu Enigma:  A Journey Through the Anomalies of Mind, Memory and Time,” and “The Trinity Secret: The Power of Three and the Code of Creation,” we began introducing a theory they called “The Grid” that envisioned the infrastructure of reality as a grid-like edifice, with doors and windows that allow for traveling between levels of reality. We even presented the visual scenario of a skyscraper with multiple floors and elevators and stairways leading from floor to floor. These various “connectors” represent the mechanisms by which we may be experiencing The Grid and may, with practice, even strengthen our ability to walk the Grid and experience parallel universes, alternate dimensions and worlds beyond the confines of space and time as we know it.

This concept was so popular with readers, radio show hosts and listeners and attendees at conferences and events, that we felt compelled to expand upon it and create a more detailed and developed scenario of what reality actually may be, and how there are unseen levels that we normally have little or no access to…unless we find the door…the window…the stairwell. The elevators that connect the levels of what we call, The Grid.

All the years we spent researching The Grid, what it is, how it is accessed, and how we can learn to use The Grid to expand our awareness and empower our lives, we ourselves were having numerous “paranormal” experiences that proved to us how valid the concept was. Both of our fathers passed away within a few months of each other, and we both had a strange “knowing” that the other’s parent had died. Larry also lost his mom the same year and had many unusual experiences where he felt he was being contacted by his parents, despite his usual scientific and skeptical nature. I, too, have had way too many experiences and synchronicities in my life to deny the existence of a web of connectivity that we are all immersed in.

The Grid is a concept that, to us,  presents an intriguing and exciting possibility – that reality actually does have a form, a structure, a blueprint… with layer upon layer of interlocking and intersecting realities that allow glimpses and passages to other levels. Yet the Grid is also the entirety of this infrastructure, the whole entirety of creation, itself. Including us. We exist within The Grid, but are also The Grid itself.

Writing this book (our sixth non-fiction book together) has been a blast for us, because we got to combine our immense passion for the subject matter into a project that we feel is ongoing, because so many other researchers, writers and thinkers are out there working on similar theories. Our hope is that a book can begin a dialog, and we know that any book really is only in a sense one small part of a much bigger conversation.

Larry and I also realized, though, that one introductory book could only do and say so much, so we signed with a fiction publisher to write a novel that features the science and theories presented in the Grid non-fiction book. “Gridwalkers” will be released next fall and we are excited to be able to talk more about what we feel passionate about with readers who know that even in the telling of a story, there can emerge great truths. That is the beauty of fiction; that it allows us to go far beyond the scope of fact and law and limitation, and use our imaginations to wonder “what if?” Fiction can be more honest and actually more filled with fact than non-fiction, because it lacks the boundaries that non-fiction presents. Without fiction, science fiction in particular, many of today’s amazing achievements in science would have never happened, because they began as a spark of the imagination in the mind of someone who saw the limits, but was able to “think beyond them.” That is what we hope we have done, are doing, and will continue to do.

In order to really know who we are, why we are here and where we are going after this life is over, it helps to have some “basic” grasp of what reality is. And while nobody can prove anything yet, and laws of nature and science are always being challenged, even overturned, we hope our journey is one that many will relate to…and grow from.

We hope to make Gridwalkers out of everyone!

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Thank you Marie for being a guest on my blog today! Please stop by her website where you’ll find all the info. on how to purchase any of her books. I guarantee they are a fascinating read!

Authors Unplugged With Marie D. Jones

Thursday, August 11th, 2011

Hey all, if you get a chance pop on over to my 6pm Eastern Time show at Authors Unplugged today on Blogtalkradio.com. My guest will be author Marie D. Jones. You can find me at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/authorsunplugged/2011/08/11/chat-with-author-marie-d-jones